GBF Gets Results

GBF’s Work Produces Results

There is overwhelming evidence that building a strong
programme of voluntary donation offers enormous rewards

Mobile clinics give rural population the opportunity to donate blood, increasing the blood supply

Mobile clinics give rural population the opportunity to donate blood, increasing the blood supply

GBF’s core focus on enabling volunteer donation has a wealth of evidence to support its effectiveness.

UNAIDS programme report a number of studies that observe managing the transfusion transmitted infection (TTI) risk of selected donors – i.e. effective donor management – is more effective than HIV antigen testing.

Experience in the field supports this conclusion. Careful donor selection programs in South Africa, a country with extremely high HIV/AIDS prevalence, has reduced HIV in the donor population to less than 0.25%, demonstrating the dramatic impact that such strategies can deliver.

And WHO figures show significant increases in voluntary donation in low and middle-income countries. They recorded an increase of over 10 million blood donations from voluntary unpaid donors since 2004, with particusdlarly high increases in South-East Asia (78%) and Africa (51%).

However, while more than seventy countries still rely on family/replacement donor for most of their blood collection - and around a third of these continue to actually pay donors - there remains much work to be done. But there is extensive evidence that, with concerted effort, significant progress can continue to be made in this important area.